WOMEN’S ALLIANCE FOR KURDISTAN, IRAQ AND SYRIA

https://peaceinkurdistancampaign.com/activities/womens-alliance-for-kurdistan-iraq-and-syria/

NEWS BRIEFING September 2018

This edition includes a focus on the history and current situation of the Saturday Mothers Protest in Istanbul

 

  1. TURKEY: Listen to the Saturday Mothers
  2. Turkey: Mothers of Disappeared: Take Action
  3. Turkey: Authorities must ensure relatives of people forcibly disappeared can continue with their peaceful weekly vigil
  4. Istanbul riot police break up Saturday Mothers’ vigil
  5. Saturday Mothers
  6. Defiant 82-year-old co-founder of Saturday Mothers Emine Ocak vows to continue peaceful protest after arrest
  7. Turkish Probe Reignites the ‘Saturday Mothers’
  8. Saturday Mothers of Turkey
  9. Turkey: Clashes erupt as Saturday Mothers protest for missing
  10. Turkish families protest disappearances (“Saturday Mothers”), 1995-1999
  11. The Women of the Revolution: Inside the Kurdish Rojava Revolution
  12. Yezidis: A minority of genocides
  13. Murder in Shengal against Yazidis: Turkey, the KDP and the United States.
  14. Justice after genocide: The Ezidis
  15. Islamophobia is preventing the empowerment of Muslim women repressed by political agendas

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The Saturday Mothers

Following a recent visit to Istanbul, Ali Has writes:

The Saturday Mothers (Cumartesi Anneleri) is a group who gathers 12pm every Saturday for half an hour at Galatasaray (district), Istanbul (Turkey), holding photographs of their “lost” loved ones. Mainly composed of mothers of victims, and renowned as a model of civil disobedience, they combine silent sit-in with communal vigil as their method of protest against the forced disappearances and political murders in Turkey during the military coup-era of 1980s and the state of emergency rule of the 1990s. In September 2018, they held their 700th sit-in protest, which was violently disrupted and has not been allowed since. But decide to disrupt and ban this peaceful protest now? It would appear that with the addition of former Turkish prime minister Tansu Ciller during the 1993-1996 and the then chief of police for Turkey Mehmet Agir in the current political arena alongside the ruling government that the banning of this protest is a gesture of good will or a “wink of the eye” aimed at appeasing them. Indeed, it is largely believed that it was at the direct orders of the two said actors or on their watch that most of the disappearances were ordered and occurred.  Continue reading