Statement by the Executive Council of the KCK

The Executive Council of the KCK has released a detailed declaration, published on 9 October, which expresses their view of the Kurdish liberation movement, present developments and how they envision the conflict can be resolved. They list three main demands:

1. The constitutional and legal safeguarding of the Kurds’ existence, identity and culture, and recognition of the Kurdish identity and freedom of expression and association.
2. Acceptance of the Kurds’ existence as a society and their own administration, that is, acceptance of democratic autonomy.
3. The acceptance of mother tongue education at every level on account of their being a people subjected to cultural genocide.

The statement is also available for download (doc)

 

Kurdistan Democratic Communities Union (KCK)

TO OUR PEOPLES AND DEMOCRATIC PUBLIC OPINION!

9 October 2013

 

The Kurdish question emerged as a result of the Turkish state’s policy of Turkification through its denial of the Kurds’ existence and subjecting them to cultural genocide. All the Kurds’ objections to this policy have been violently crushed. Once the Kurds had been silenced and reduced to a state where they could not protest, the cultural genocide was accelerated using economic, social and cultural policies. By the 1970s the Kurds had been left with no option but to become Turkish in order to perpetuate their lives. A political, social, economic, cultural and psychological environment had been created that drove Kurds away from Kurdishness, putting it on the path to extinction.

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BDP MP for Hakkari Adil Zozani: ‘We are determined to take this journey for peace’

INTERVIEW

1 October 2013

 

Mr Adil Zozani, Member of Parliament for the pro-Kurdish Peace and Democracy Party (BDP), was recently in the UK to attend the Labour Party Conference and address a public meeting with members of London’s Kurdish community. Peace in Kurdistan Campaign spoke with him about the conference, the BDP’s role in current peace negotiations for the resolution of the Kurdish Question, and about Turkey’s questionable role in developments in Rojava, northern Syria.

How has your message been received so far in the UK, and in particular, at the Labour Party Conference, where you spoke at a meeting that was attended by the Turkish Ambassador to the UK?

The Labour Party Conference was very interesting, and it was clear they are very excited about the possibility being in leadership again.  I met many people who were in solidarity with the Kurdish movement and found that the Kurdish question was well known amongst them.

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