Theresa May gives backing to President Erdogan and Turkey’s war on the Kurds

Contact Details: 11 Portland Gardens, Fairfax Hall, Londond, N4 1HU. Phone: 0208 8880 1804

Contact Details: 11 Portland Gardens Fairfax Hall, Londond, N4 1HU kurdscentre@gmail.com 0208 8880 1804

KURDISH PEOPLE’S DEMOCRATIC ASSEMBLY

During Turkish President Erdogan’s visit to Britain, the British Prime Minister Theresa May expressed her support for Turkey and said that Erdogan was seeking to defend his country from ‘the extraordinary pressures of a failed coup and Kurdish terrorism’. This designation of ‘Kurdish terrorism’ is exactly the formulation that Erdogan uses to legitimise the Turkish states’ war on the Kurds in Turkey, Syria and Iraq. This is a designation that we utterly and categorically condemn. The Kurds far from being terrorists have been Britain’s staunch allies against the scourge of the terrorism of ISIS, providing the boots on the ground in the Middle East and paying a heavy personal price for the freedom of us all . The Metropolitan Police has however brought Turkey’s war to the streets of London, using police dogs and horses to threaten people and arrest some 16 or so people in Whitehall, who were protesting at Erdogan’s visit to Downing Street. Kurds, and their supporters, in Britain are being criminalised as they are in Turkey. Continue reading

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BOYCOTT TOURISM IN TURKEY

DON’T TAKE THEIR HOPEFUL SMILE AWAY:
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Thinking of Holidaying in TURKEY? Please think again!

Why you might consider visiting Turkey

Turkey is known for its inexpensive holiday packages and for pleasant weather, beaches, and historical sites dating back thousands of years.

Why you should avoid visiting Turkey

Turkey has become increasingly autocratic, with Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan solidifying his grasp on power following a referendum of questionable legitimacy on presidential powers in 2017. Erdogan has purged the ranks of the country’s government, judiciary and military, and Turkey has become the number one imprisoner of journalists worldwide. Erdogan’s authoritarian regime instrumentalises Islam for its own power purposes and has put immense pressure on women and religious and ethnic minorities such as Alevis and Yezidis, and anti-Semitism and anti-Christian rhetoric are mainstream. Foreign visitors may not feel welcomed with open arms or at least will instantly see a change in attitude once they question the actions of Erdogan and Turkey – doing so can mean risking detention and deportation, or even jail time. Continue reading

Survivors of the Syrian Wars

Patrick Cockburn

When I first visited Kurdish-held territory in northern Syria, early in 2015, it was rapidly expanding. With the help of massive US air-power, the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) had just retaken the city of Kobani from Islamic State. YPG fighters were linking together the Kurdish population centres south of the Syrian-Turkish frontier to create a de facto Kurdish state – they called it Rojava. I met a squad of YPG fighters mopping up after a battle with IS for control of a range of forested hills called Mount Abdulaziz, west of the Kurdish-Arab city of Hasaka. Signs of the recent IS presence included the burned-out remains of cars that had been used as bombs and some fresh pro-IS graffiti on the walls of a captured building. Lying in the debris inside were neatly printed IS ration cards with the names, ID numbers and personal details of recipients: evidence that IS, monstrous militarised cult though it was, was also a well-organised administrative machine. Foreign IS fighters had evidently been stationed in the building: in a discarded notebook were Arabic words translated into various languages as well as drawings of household items – a desk, a chair – along with their names in Arabic. The YPG soldiers, who all looked very young, were cheerful after their success. Botan Damhat, the squad leader, who was only 18, said the swift victory had come about through the combination of YPG ground troops and US airstrikes. ‘Without the American planes it would have been much harder to take the mountain,’ he said. ‘We would have won in the end, but we would have lost a lot more men.’ Continue reading

OPEN LETTER TO PRIME MINISTER THERESA MAY

Mesopotamian Ecology Movement, Initiative to Keep Hasankeyf Alive, The Corner House and Peace in Kurdistan Campaign

Rt Hon. Theresa May MP
Prime Minister
10 Downing Street
London, SW1A 2AA

April 28, 2018

Dear Prime Minister,

The Ilisu Dam and Turkey’s use of water as a weapon of war

We write as civil society organizations to draw your attention to the imminent impoundment by Turkey of the Ilisu Dam on River Tigris in contravention of international customary law relating to shared waterways, which requires negotiation and agreement on downstream flows. The announced impoundment of Ilisu comes at a time when Turkey is recklessly and illegally using water as a weapon of war against Northern Syria, denying those affected of their right to water, threatening to exacerbate the existing conflicts in the region and causing severe suffering to those who have already suffered seven years of brutal civil war. We would urge you to protest Turkey’s intended impoundment of Ilisu and to use all available diplomatic means to mediate a peaceful and fair settlement between Turkey, Syria and Iraq on the use of their shared rivers. Continue reading

Ecology in Democratic Confederalism

Ecology discussions and practices in the Kurdish Freedom Struggle with a focus on North Kurdistan (Bakur)

by Ercan Ayboga
September 2017

Ecology is one of the three pillars of the paradigm of Democratic Confederalism, the political-theoretical concept of the Kurdish Freedom Movement. Besides democracy and gender liberation, ecology has been mentioned explicitly as a dimension in this concept since 2005. However to date, ecology is less discussed and practiced than the two other pillars. Continue reading

BOYCOTT TOURISM IN TURKEY

Thinking of Holidaying in TURKEY? Please think again!

 Why you might consider visiting Turkey

Turkey is known for its inexpensive holiday packages and for pleasant weather, beaches, and historical sites dating back thousands of years.

Why you should avoid visiting Turkey

Turkey has become increasingly autocratic, with Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan solidifying his grasp on power following a referendum of questionable legitimacy on presidential powers in 2017. Erdogan has purged the ranks of the country’s government, judiciary and military, and Turkey has become the number one imprisoner of journalists worldwide. Erdogan’s authoritarian regime instrumentalises Islam for its own power purposes and has put immense pressure on women and religious and ethnic minorities such as Alevis and Yezidis, and anti-Semitism and anti-Christian rhetoric are mainstream. Foreign visitors may not feel welcomed with open arms or at least will instantly see a change in attitude once they question the actions of Erdogan and Turkey – doing so can mean risking detention and deportation, or even jail time.
Boycott T .jpg

If you do not want to enjoy your vacation time alongside some of the world’s most notorious jihadist groups, you should avoid Turkey Continue reading

FREEDOM FOR OCALAN

FREEDOM FOR OCALAN

Freedom for Abdullah Ocalan and the political prisoners in Turkey. Ocalan’s freedom will mark a breakthrough for the democratization of Turkey and peace in Kurdistan.

www.freedomforocalan.org

A UK TRADE UNION CAMPAIGN
4 April 2018 –                       For immediate use

 Birthday Greetings to jailed Kurdish leader Abdullah Öcalan

 The trade union based Freedom for Öcalan Campaign has asked the British Ambassador to Turkey to help them deliver birthday greetings to jailed Kurdish leader Abdullah Öcalan. Continue reading

SOLIDARITY GREETINGS TO ABDULLH OCALAN

Peace in Kurdistan sends its solidarity greetings to Abdullah Ocalan, the leader of the Kurdish people, on the occasion of his 69th birthday on 4 April 2018.

Abdullah Ocalan has spent too many of his birthdays in confinement, so that his birthday has become just another day like all others: a day that is not his own, whose freedom has been stolen from him.

Normally a birthday is a time to see friends and family. it is a time to share with all those who are closest to you, to celebrate, reminisce and look to the future. It is an occasion for people to come together, for you to learn how much you are respected, appreciated and loved. Continue reading